climate

Genetics professor to lead corn pangenome project

Posted 7 months 1 week ago
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Distinguished Research Professor Kelly Dawe in the department of genetics is principal investigator on a new project to sequence the genetic diversity of the world's largest cash crop:

When the human genome was first sequenced in 2001, the project focused on a single individual. Since that time, several new genomes have been assembled and additional genetic data have been generated for thousands of individuals, producing a more complete picture of human genetic makeup, with broad implications for human health, from biomedical science to anthropology. Now, researchers plan to begin a...

Solar eclipse - teachable afternoon about the sun and climate

Posted 1 year 2 weeks ago
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The University of Georgia will host a viewing party of the solar eclipse on August 21. Professor Marshall Shepherd uses his Forbes column to underscore a crucial point about the rare event:

Intuitively, I think most people understand that we have seasons because the Earth is tilted on its axis as it rotates around the sun. We are currently in northern (southern) hemisphere summer (winter) because that hemisphere is tilting toward the sun and receiving more direct energy. I often cringe during the winter when someone tweets, "it's snowing so what do they mean global warming."

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‘Atmospheric rivers’ also common in the Southeast

Posted 1 year 5 months ago
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Some timely and informative new research from geography faculty and graduate students on aspects of the erratic weather seen recently:

Much of the flood-inducing rainfall that has pummeled California over the last month flowed into the region via a river in the sky. But these so-called atmospheric rivers, which transport large quantities of water vapor poleward from the tropics, can wreak havoc in the Southeast as well.

University of Georgia geography and atmospheric sciences researchers provide the first detailed climatological analysis of Southeastern atmospheric rivers in...

Noted and Quoted, summer 2016

Posted 1 year 12 months ago
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Expert voices and new research had Franklin faculty featured in the media on a range of subjects from climate change to the 'love hormone' to the discovery of a Spanish fort on the South Carolina coast. A sampling (only through July!):

Just a few more bites: Defining moderation varies by individual, study finds (Michelle vanDellen, psychology) – ScienceDaily

You can't lose weight with moderate eating – Times of India

Study reveals that eating "in moderation" is a fool's errand– Huffington Post

Eating in moderation varies by individual – Science 2.0

The...

Greenland ice melting and arctic amplification

Posted 2 years 2 months ago
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Last week, Nature Communications published a study by a collaborative group of researchers that showed a connection between the Greenland ice melt in the summer of 2015 and a phenomenon known as 'arctic amplification.' Our very own Thomas Mote, a professor in the department of geography, was part of this study and has contributed to countless climate change related studies in the past. 

The Greenland ice sheet, Earth's second largest after Antarctica, holds enough ice that if it were to melt entirely, it would raise average global sea level by about 7 meters, or almost 23 feet....

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