climate change

Communicating research to the public

Posted 4 months 3 weeks ago
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The varied effects of climate change. The Zika virus. Vaccinations and immunizations. Are bumble bees disappearing? How do we keep our data private? As the media catches up with the latest scientific findings and relates them to the public, how should the public interpret them? It's a big question, especially given the volume of research publications and the click-bait business model of many online news sources. It can be easy for the public to be misled or simply to ignore significant new findings. A recent symposium on helping the public interpret new research presented some important...

Mapping the change in deep ocean habitats

Posted 5 months 1 week ago
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Google maps for the undersea world? A new University of Georgia project is designed to make that become a reality.

The project, Mapping Deep Blue Habitat in a Changing Climate, aims to create an underwater 3-D map that illustrates spatial information about habitat characteristics like temperature, oxygen, light, using computational and graphical tools so that scientists, stakeholders, and the public can “see” how the ocean habitats will change.

The project was among 21 interdisciplinary seed grants totaling $1.55 million announced June 12 by the National Academies Keck...

Noted and Quoted, April 2017

Posted 7 months 14 hours ago
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Franklin faculty and students continue to be quoted by and to author articles across worldwide media, including all major print publications. A sample from the past few weeks:

Research by Archeology graduate student Sammantha Nicole Holder had her featured in The Guardian (reconstructing the diet of Napoleon's Grand Army)

The other side of Confederate Memorial Day (Spalding Distinguished Professor of History, Emeritus James Cobb) – Time

Four words people ask meteorologists about that are actually not weather terms (Georgia Athletic Association Distinguished Professor...

Rising water temperatures endanger health of coastal ecosystems

Posted 7 months 4 days ago
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Increasing water temperatures are responsible for the accumulation of the chemical nitrite in marine environments throughout the world, a symptom of broader changes in normal ocean biochemical pathways that could ultimately disrupt ocean food webs, according to new marine science research:

Nitrite is produced when microorganisms consume ammonium in waste products from fertilizers, treated sewage and animal waste. Too much nitrite can alter the kinds and amounts of single-celled plants living in marine environments, potentially affecting the animals that feed on them, said James...

Ganeshan and Wilkes named 2017 Udall Scholars

Posted 7 months 1 week ago
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UGA added two new Udall Scholars to its ranks this year as third-year students Shreya Ganeshan and Elizabeth Wilkes were honored for their leadership, public service and commitment to issues related to the environment.

Each year, the Udall Foundation awards about 60 scholarships to college sophomores and juniors for their efforts related to Native American nations or their work in environmental advocacy and policy.

Ganeshan, from Johns Creek, is majoring in economics and statistics and plans to pursue a doctorate in clean energy innovation and deployment. Wilkes, from Atlanta...

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