climate change

The 'Anthro' in Anthropcene

Posted 2 years 10 months ago
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Who is the 'Anthro' in Anthropocene? A very good question, and professor of philosophy and women's studies Chris J. Cuomo provides the answer Thursday at the Chapel in this week's installement of the Anthropocene Lecture Series:

The term “anthropocene” has gained enormous popularity among scientists who believe that we are currently in a global geological era that is distinguished by the extensive and lasting impacts that “human” activities (i.e. fossil fuel combustion, deforestation, pollution, etc.) are having on all of Earth’s vital systems. But should the practices, institutions...

Carbon Sequestration in Salt Marshes

Posted 2 years 10 months ago
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The importance of the world's rainforests, and to some extent the mangroves, as storage sinks for atmospheric are carbon well-known. But salt marshes, too, are extraordinarily efficient mechanism for photosynthesis and the production of biomass that work together to sequester carbon at a high rate. So disappearing wetlands along the coast present much more peril than loss against storm surge, which itself plays significant part in their role in an ecosystem.

Now, Deepak Mishra, associate professor in the department of geography, has developed tools and techniques to map carbon...

Shepherd: Lessons on climate from Ebola outbreak

Posted 2 years 11 months ago
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Athletics Association Professor in the Social Sciences and nationally-recognized expert on climate Marshall Shepherd took to the pages of the Washingtom Post last week to point out connections between the latest Ebola outbreak and the challenges presented by climate change:

However, before I mention these parallels, I want to establish that I trust the expertise and knowledge of those in the infectious disease and public health communities, respectively. As an expert in weather and climate, I often see  “arm-chair expertise” or Ph.D.’s from other disciplines, questioning weather...

Anthropocene: Economics of the transition

Posted 2 years 11 months ago
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Something that often goes missing in conversations on, much less debates about, what to do about climate change is optimism. If, for example, a discussion of the economics of the transition to an industrial model from the agricultural age had occured, there would have been great gnashing of teeth but a convincing case could have been made, though likely with some strict limitations toward eventual consequences, if these could have been imagined. The point is, the same dynamics are at play when trying to imagine the transition away from a dependence on fossil fuels; we're limited by how...

Urbanization and Climate Change: Anthropocene

Posted 2 years 12 months ago
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Coming on the heels of the People's Climate March yesterday in NYC, the next installment of the Anthropocene Lecture Series this week promises to be timely and informative:

The 21st century is the first urban century in the history of humankind.  Current projections suggest that 60-80% of the world population will live in urban settlements by the end of this century.  The urban environment alters climate, weather, and natural cycles (e.g.. water and biogeochemical).  Such interactions also influence human health, energy consumption, transportation, and planning.  Influential at...

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