history

4 Minutes, 33 Seconds: Spotlight on Scholarship in the Arts

Posted 3 weeks 3 days ago
john_cage_433_.png

Not so silently riffing on the John Cage stunt, reportedly his favorite work, from 1952, the Spotlight on the Arts festival is hosting a competition for graduate students with the deadline for entries on Monday Oct. 2:

This competition highlights scholarly research by UGA students about any art form or combination of art forms, including (but not restricted to): visual art, music, theatre, dance, film, literature, media arts, or performance art. The focus is on historical, theoretical, and critical research about art, as opposed to original works of art created by the students. This...

Bringing Middle East history, discovery to the classroom

Posted 3 weeks 6 days ago
Jones teaser.jpg

As the Middle East expert in the history department, assistant professor Kevin Jones teaches a three-part survey on the region, a course on the Arab-Israel conflict and an Honors course on religion, nationalism and revolution. The combination reflects an ongoing scholarly journey that all began in Jones' earliest days of college:

"My first day as an undergraduate student was Sept. 11, 2001," Jones said. "The Middle East was in the news, and as an undergraduate I took some classes to try and better understand it."

A philosophy major at Wake Forest University, Jones gravitated...

Noted and Quoted, summer 2017

Posted 2 months 1 week ago
plankton.jpeg

Algal blooms, Waffle House eclipse-viewing, food insecurity, Planet of the Apes, work-life conflicts and many more stories, Franklin College faculty kept a full schedule in media across the globe this summer. Here's a sampling:

Assistant professor of geography Jerry Shannon creates map of Waffle House restaurants to watch the solar eclipse from – AJC, R&B, WSB, Q & A in the Chronicle of Higher Education

Science says: Trump team garbles climate science (Georgia Athletic Association Distinguished Professor Marshall Shepherd) – WTOP

Trump’s tax plan a reminder of...

Iroquois: Population Dispersal and Signaling Networks

Posted 2 months 2 weeks ago
Huronie.jpg

Anthropology professor Jennifer Birch co-authored a new paper in Science Advances that focuses on Northern Iroquoia to illuminate the effects of population dispersal on regional signaling networks:

What happens to regional social interaction networks when an important group leaves the network? The dispersal of Iroquoian groups from the St. Lawrence River valley during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries A.D. has been a source of archaeological inquiry for decades. Social network analysis presented here indicates that sites from Jefferson County, New York at the head of the St....

The history of summer vacation

Posted 3 months 1 week ago
vacation teaser_0.jpg

Professor Stephen Mihm shares a history of how summer vacation took hold on the pages of Bloomberg:

By the early 20th century, the idea that parents and children alike needed to rest their brains and commune with the great outdoors had become an article of faith among the middle class.  While summer vacation never grew to the outsized proportions found in many European countries, it has nonetheless persisted as an American ritual, with July and August the peak months for family sojourns.

In recent years, though, this once-solid institution has eroded.  Many school districts,...

Pages