Uma Nagendra Dances her Ph.D.

Posted 3 years 4 months ago

This is a quite visionary joining of art and science:

University of Georgia doctoral student Uma Nagendra flipped and twisted her way to the top prize in the seventh annual Dance Your Ph.D. contest for her video explaining biology research through an aerial dance performance.

The contest, sponsored by Science Magazine, the Association of the Advancement of Science and HighWire Press, challenged scientists around the world to explain their Ph.D. research through the art form of dance. Nagendra's video was chosen from 12 finalists as the overall winner by an expert panel of...

Anthropocene: Economics of the transition

Posted 3 years 5 months ago

Something that often goes missing in conversations on, much less debates about, what to do about climate change is optimism. If, for example, a discussion of the economics of the transition to an industrial model from the agricultural age had occured, there would have been great gnashing of teeth but a convincing case could have been made, though likely with some strict limitations toward eventual consequences, if these could have been imagined. The point is, the same dynamics are at play when trying to imagine the transition away from a dependence on fossil fuels; we're limited by how...

Jessica Kissinger: making research usable

Posted 3 years 5 months ago

Great opportunity to feature not just one of our star faculty members, but also an emerging challenge for all researchers everywhere in this era of big data:

Jessica Kissinger is a molecular geneticist whose research on the evolution of disease and the genomes of eukaryotic pathogenic organisms—Cryptosporidium, Sarcocystis, Toxoplasma andPlasmodium (malaria) among them—has led her to perhaps the emerging issue among research scientists: managing data.

"To solve a complex problem like a disease, whether you're looking for a new drug target or just trying to understand the...

UGA discovery: building better plants

Posted 3 years 5 months ago

The complexity of natural materials has long been a point of fascination for scientists, and has only increased as the technology to look closer has itself evolved. The structure and development of sea shells, for example, holds great potential for nanotechnology and building light weight materials of great strength. So, too, the cell walls of plants, whose flexibility and strength depend on two critical proteins. Now UGA scientists have discovered how these fundamental components of plant life might one day help scientists engineer improved plants for biofuels, construction materials,...

Next Science Cafe subject - Vaccinations

Posted 3 years 6 months ago
SciCafe Vaccines.jpeg

Are vaccinations controversial? And what does that even mean when the vast majority of physicians are troubled by the so-called anti-vaccination movement. There is little doubt that the administration of antigenic material (aka vaccines) to stimulate an individual's immune system to develop adaptive immunity to a pathogen is responsible for the worldwide eradicaiton of smallpox and the diminution of polio, measles and tetanus. So... what's the controversy about? 

On Tuesday, September 16th at 7pm at Hendershot's Coffee Bar, the Athens Science Cafe presents "Immunize This! The...