Romance Languages Special Guest Colloquium: Antonia Arslan and Siobhan Nash-Marshall

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“Post-Truths and People: The Armenian Genocide and its Negation,” Antonia Arslan, author and former professor of Italian modern and contemporary literature at the University of Padova, and Siobhan Nash-Marshall, professor of philosophy and the Mary T. Clark Chair of Christian Philosophy at Manhattanville College.

Sponsored by the Romance Languages Fund

Antonia Arslan was a professor of Italian modern and contemporary literature at the University of Padova. She is the author of innovative studies in 19th-century Italian literature (Dame, droga e galline. Il romanzo popolare italiano fra Ottocento e Novecento) and on the “submerged galaxy” of Italian women writers (Dame, galline e regine. La scrittura femminile italiana fra '800 e '900, and, with G. Romani, Writing to Delight. Italian Short Stories by Nineteenth-Century Women Writers). Through the poetry of the great Daniel Varujan (who died during the Genocide) – which she translated with C. Megighian and A. Hemmat Siraky – she gave voice to  her profound and unexpressed Armenian identity. 

Siobhan Nash-Marshall is a professor of philosophy and the Mary T. Clark Chair of Christian Philosophy at Manhattanville College. Her specializations are metaphysics and medieval philosophy. Author of many academic books and articles –  “Free Will, Evil, and Saint Augustine” in Quaestiones Disputatae; “Evil, Pain, and the Problem of Properties” in Aquinas and Maritain on Evil: Mystery and Metaphysics; “Lies, Damned Lies, and Genocide” in Metaphilosophy and “Boethius’s Influence on Theology and Metaphysics to the XVI century” in Brill Companion to Boethius in the Middle Ages – she has also written books for the general public like Joan of Arc: A Spiritual Biography and What it Takes to be Free: Religion and the Roots of Democracy.