Tue, 05/01/2018 - 10:49am
Associate professor of chemistry Jin Xie is using nanotechnology to make chemotherapy and radiation therapy more effective while minimizing their toxic side effects: What are your favorite courses and why? I redeveloped the nanomaterials course, and I enjoy teaching it. Nanotechnology, especially nanobiotechnology, is a highly interdisciplinary field, and it is rapidly evolving. In this course, I not only introduce basic nanoparticle synthesis…
Tags: Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases (CTEGD), Social Sciences, Correll Hall
Mon, 09/19/2016 - 11:06am
"Medieval alchemists tried to create gold from other metals," she said. "That's kind of what we did with our research. It's not real alchemy, in the medieval sense, but it is a sort of 21st century version." Gold has long been a valuable resource for industry, medicine, dentistry, computers, electronics and aerospace, among others, due to unique physical and chemical properties that make it inert and resistant to oxidation. But because of its…
Tags: Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases (CTEGD), Human Nature
Mon, 07/27/2015 - 3:11pm
Later this month, a symposium will highlight the research of 10 undergraduate students from across the country who have been participating in a 10-week Research Experiences for Undergraduates program funded by the National Science Foundation. Boasting from programs as prestigious as MIT and University of California, Berkeley, the students will present their research in nanotechnology and biomedicine Friday, July 31 beginning at 8 a.m. at the…
Tags: Human Nature, Department of Psychology, Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases (CTEGD), International
Thu, 07/17/2014 - 12:23pm
Great new work from Franklin College researchers that should garner significant attention: Researchers at the University of Georgia and their collaborators have developed a new technique to enhance stroke treatment that uses magnetically controlled nanomotors to rapidly transport a clot-busting drug to potentially life-threatening blockages in blood vessels. The only drug currently approved for the treatment of acute stroke—recombinant tissue…
Tags: Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases (CTEGD), Human Nature, Omisoka, Yule
Thu, 08/15/2013 - 11:40am
Researchers from the department of chemistry, in the early online edition of ACS Nano, report progress on an innovative new use for nanoparticles: The human body operates under a constant state of martial law. Chief among the enforcers charged with maintaining order is the immune system, a complex network that seeks out and destroys the hordes of invading bacteria and viruses that threaten the organic society as it goes about its work. The…
Tags: Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases (CTEGD), biochemistry and molecular biology, Staff, student, Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies, Human Nature
Tue, 01/22/2013 - 9:50am
UGA researchers have received significant NIH support for development of new tools to detect virus strains of influenza: researchers are refining a nanotechnology-based method that uses laser light beams to more accurately predict emerging influenza strains-particularly strains with a risk of high mortality. The work will be funded by the National Institutes of Health and will total $1,124,914 over the next four years. Influenza kills thousands…
Tags: Human Nature, Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases (CTEGD)
Mon, 08/27/2012 - 10:08am
The physicist Richard Feynman gave his famous lecture, There's Always Room at the Bottom, in 1959, considered by many as the conceptual birth of nanotechnology. And ever since, nanotechnology has represented a very promising avenue for all manner of scientific research and application, from drug delivery to hydrogen fuel cell storage. As such it has attracted the attention of some of the world's premier researchers and we're now approaching, if…
Tags: Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases (CTEGD), Creswell Hall, Human Nature
Fri, 07/20/2012 - 9:37am
In a series of studies, UGA researchers have developed a single-step method that can detect viruses, bacteria and chemical contaminants: "The results are unambiguous and quickly give you a high degree of specificity," said senior author Yiping Zhao, professor of physics in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences and director of the university's Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center. Zhao and his co-authors—doctoral students Jing Chen…
Tags: Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases (CTEGD), Human Nature, Odum School of Ecology, Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies