Skip to main content
Skip to main menu

Slideshow

Tags: stressors

Thu, 12/09/2021 - 11:07am
A person with schizophrenia typically experiences more negative emotions and has more stressors than average. A new study by University of Georgia psychologists revealed a surprising finding that could help those who struggle with the illness: While people with schizophrenia tend to manage low-level negative emotions, they struggle to do so as those negative emotions increase. People regulate their emotions to get from one feeling to a more…
Tue, 04/06/2021 - 4:11pm
Man Kit “Karlo” Lei came from humble beginnings in Macau, China. His mother was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease and died five years later when Lei was a teenager. It was a difficult time, but fortunately, he had good support through school and from friends. He thrived despite the challenges, earning degrees in law and sociology at National Taiwan University and then the University of Georgia. Lei’s studies led him to a question: Why do some…
Thu, 02/14/2019 - 1:14pm
UGA faculty member Katie Ehrlich is a recipient of the 2019 Association for Psychological Science Janet Taylor Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions. The award, named for the first elected APS president, celebrates the many new and leading-edge ideas coming out of the most creative and promising investigators who embody the future of psychological science. Ehrlich, assistant professor in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and…
Wed, 10/03/2018 - 10:31am
The National Institutes of Health Common Fund supports unusually innovative research from early career investigators with the High-Risk, High-Reward Research program. Assistant professor of psychology Katherine Ehrlich received a New Innovator award in the program to determine whether stressful life experiences have more immediate effects on children’s health: The $2.3 million Director’s New Innovator Award from the NIH Common Fund’s High-Risk,…
Fri, 12/18/2015 - 11:20am
Spoiler alert: No spoilers herein about the new film whatsoever. A 40-year-old essay with nearly 9,000 citations on Google scholar is the focus of a series of articles in the Chronicle of Higher Ed that, taken together, present an affirmative case for the humanities, and for understanding how popular art reflects our mores can introduce fascinating revelations that support positive individual and societal change: 40 years later, "Visual Pleasure…

Support Franklin College

We appreciate your financial support. Your gift is important to us and helps support critical opportunities for students and faculty alike, including lectures, travel support, and any number of educational events that augment the classroom experience. Click here to learn more about giving.