Mon, 01/22/2018 - 11:08am
Congratulations to Rishi Masalia, Ph.D. candidate in the department of plant biology, who has been named one of seven K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders for 2018 by the American Association of Colleges and Universities for his commitment to teaching and learning, as well as his involvement in science outreach in the Athens community. Masalia is the fifth UGA student to win the award. A biologist and bioinformatician by training, his area of…
Tags: Department of English, Waffle House, public
Mon, 11/27/2017 - 12:18pm
Franklin faculty and students appeared in a wide variety of media during the month of November. A sample: UGA studies how stress affects vaccine effectiveness – assistant professor of psychology Katherine Ehrlich quoted in the Red &Black Study says public’s politics are correlated with climate change opinion. They shouldn’t be – Georgia Athletic Association Distinguished Professor Marshall Shepherd writes in his regular column at Forbes…
Tags: Office of Development and Alumni Relations, Carl Vinson Institute of Government International Center, Four Towers Building, Department of English
Tue, 11/21/2017 - 11:22am
Graduate student papers, TedX, AAAS and new offices for our advising colleagues lead the most recent round up of kudos and congratulations: UGA sociology graduate students Tara Sutton, Brittany Martin, and Eric Klopack accepted the ‪@ASCRM41 Division on Women & Crime graduate student paper award at the 73rd annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology November 15-18 in Philadelphia, PA Former UGA faculty member and Franklin College…
Tags: Department of HIstory and the Latin American and Caribbean Institute, Office of Development and Alumni Relations, ClinEpiDB, printmaking, Department of English
Mon, 11/20/2017 - 3:01pm
Two Franklin College faculty members are among three UGA professors named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science: [The] three faculty members are among 396 new AAAS Fellows who will be presented with an official certificate and a gold and blue-representing science and engineering, respectively-rosette pin on Feb. 17 at the AAAS Fellows Forum during the 2018 AAAS Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas. "Selection as an AAAS…
Tags: ClinEpiDB, Department of English, Human Nature, summer fellows
Fri, 11/17/2017 - 1:50pm
UGA plant scientists like professor of plant biology Katrien Devos, pictured, headline the top feature of the new issue of Research Magazine: In a changing climate, stress tolerance becomes really important, according to Chung-Jui “C.J.” Tsai, Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar and professor of forestry and natural resources, and genetics. She uses model systems to find mechanisms that are applicable to any plants. “How do you grow crops—…
Tags: Department of English, movement, Fair, suburbs, Coliseum Training Facility
Fri, 11/03/2017 - 1:12pm
New research from an international team of breeders, genome scientists, and plant biologists at UGA sheds light on longstanding questions about the origin and early evolution of sex chromosomes, and at the same time serves as a foundation for asparagus breeding efforts: While most flowering plants are hermaphrodites, garden asparagus plants are typically either male (XY) or female (XX), although YY "supermales" can be produced in the greenhouse…
Tags: Department of English, government, Human Nature, meeting
Mon, 10/02/2017 - 1:03pm
In large-enrollment courses, Franklin faculty continue to be instrumental in pioneering access to free, online textbooks to help students save money and to improve teaching: The University System of Georgia (USG) has been a nationwide leader in using free online textbooks, and UGA has been at the forefront of those efforts, helping its students save more than $2.5 million since 2013. The bulk of that effort has come through a partnership with…
Tags: Office of Development and Alumni Relations, Colloquium, plants, Biomedical and Health Sciences Institute, Geography, Department of English, #GoDawgs
Wed, 05/24/2017 - 10:23am
They follow the sun's path throughout the day - hence their name in the Romance languages - and this news about the sunflower genome turns our attention to a new paper in Nature: [UGA] researchers are part of an international team that has published the first sunflower genome sequence. This new resource will assist future research programs using genetic tools to improve crop resilience and oil production. They published their findings today in …
Tags: government, Department of English, Human Nature
Mon, 10/24/2016 - 10:31am
Professor of plant biology and Creative Research Medal winner Jim Leebens-Mack investigates the history of plant life on our planet while being an active member of the local community. His laboratory compares genome sequences to better understand the genetic basis of biological innovations that are of great practical importance for horticulture and agriculture: What are your favorite courses and why? I regularly co-teach three courses—“Genome…
Tags: Department of English, Human Nature, The Linguistics Society at UGA, government
Tue, 08/16/2016 - 11:11am
The big news about Big Data on campus includes the announcement of eight new faculty members in the rapidly growing field of informatics that we welcome to UGA this year: The new hires, who will work in seven departments and five of the university's schools and colleges, build upon the university's longstanding leadership in informatics. UGA has more than 160 faculty members whose work involves the analysis of massive data sets, and plans are…
Tags: Human Nature, conjecture, Department of English
Mon, 04/25/2016 - 11:29am
Zomlefer, the curator of UGA's Herbarium and an associate professor of plant biology in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, got to work hand-in-hand with the State Botanical Garden last fall through a Public Service and Outreach Faculty fellowship. She led a number of projects, from public lectures and a two-day workshop on herbarium techniques to demonstrations for children and organization of the garden's own herbarium collection.…
Tags: DOE, #UGA18, Department of English, Odyssey
Mon, 12/08/2014 - 11:21am
If there's one thing we take for granted more than the infinite availability of water, it would be the technical ability of our best scientists should that availability ever come into question. Well, the infinite availability of water is very much in quesiton and what is the reaction of scientists? Looking to Mother nature for clues to survival in water-limited environments: [With] a $1.5 million collaborative grant from the National Science…
Tags: freshman, Computer Science, The Linguistics Society at UGA, Department of English, Awards
Tue, 11/04/2014 - 9:29am
This is a quite visionary joining of art and science: University of Georgia doctoral student Uma Nagendra flipped and twisted her way to the top prize in the seventh annual Dance Your Ph.D. contest for her video explaining biology research through an aerial dance performance. The contest, sponsored by Science Magazine, the Association of the Advancement of Science and HighWire Press, challenged scientists around the world to explain their Ph.D.…
Tags: Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center, Earth, public, Department of English, SPIA, criminal justice, English
Tue, 01/28/2014 - 10:47am
Great Q & A on the UGA homepage with professor of plant biology Lisa Donovan:   When did you come to UGA and what brought you here? I came to the University of Georgia in 1995 and was attracted by the diversity and excellence of the plant biologists here. What are your favorite courses and why? At the undergraduate level, I enjoy contributing to BIOL 1108, “Principles of Plant Biology II” for biology majors, because it provides the…
Tags: Department of English, Colloquium, Human Nature
Wed, 10/23/2013 - 11:04am
I was trained as a conventional plant breeder but have been fortunate to participate in genome sequencing to reveal the entire genetic blueprint(s) of most of the crops that I study. Their unique attributes make crop plants valuable both commercially and as botanical models, thus linking increased fundamental knowledge to improving human lives. Genome sequences empower many new opportunities to improve plants to better suit human needs while…
Tags: criminology, Department of English, Human Nature
Fri, 02/01/2013 - 3:10pm
Great new work from Debra Mohnen and Li Tan in the BioEnergy Science Center: When Li Tan approached his colleagues at the University of Georgia with some unusual data he had collected, they initially seemed convinced that his experiment had become contaminated; what he was seeing simply didn’t make any sense. Tan was examining some of the sugars, proteins and polymers that make up plant cell walls, which provide the structural support and…
Tags: Human Nature, University of Georgia Opera Theatre, Department of English, Psychology
Thu, 12/20/2012 - 3:48pm
A ScienceNow article in Wired.com features the work of a faculty member from psychology: Primatologist Dorothy Fragaszy of the University of Georgia in Athens says orangutans might have ideas of the sort that Gruber describes, but that’s not the most plausible explanation. Fragaszy cautions that Gruber cites only one study that discusses orangutans developing stick skills in the wild — and she says that work isn’t conclusive about when…
Tags: Carl Vinson Institute of Government International Center, Department of English, Department of Sociology and the Center for Family Research, The Linguistics Society at UGA
Tue, 08/07/2012 - 10:33am
The slowest-moving indicators can often be the most difficult to study, requiring patience and a general knowledge of many overlapping correlations. It's axiomatic that the seeming constants in life become the benchmarks and things we depend on, even though there are no true constants - with the exception of change itself. Learning from these changes also takes a great deal of patience, honed skills of observation and a diversity of knowledge…
Tags: Performance, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, Department of English
Fri, 03/30/2012 - 9:26am
Vincent van Gogh produced five versions of sunflowers in vases or bouqets, each subtly distinct from the others. Often accused of the dual curse of genius and madness, UGA scientists have confirmed that, though van Gogh may have had other struggles, inaccurate vision was not among them.   In a study published March 29 in the journal PLoS Genetics, however, a team of University of Georgia scientists reveals the mutation behind the distinctive,…
Tags: Department of English, Philosophy
Thu, 03/01/2012 - 12:10pm
Next week, the Franklin College hosts Indiana University Chancellor's Professor Roger Hangartner for two lectures in two different parts of campus that bring some focus to a little-regarded subject: the secret life of plants: Lamar Dodd School of Art will present a lecture by molecular, cellular and developmental biologist Roger Hangarter of Indiana University on March 6 at 5:30 p.m. in room S150 of the art school. His talk on "Plants: They…
Tags: Department of English, Financial Planning Research Center