Tue, 03/13/2018 - 11:30am
Great overview of the work by Franklin College faculty in the Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases, where multi-track efforts are yielding gains against some of the world's worst scourges: Founded 20 years ago by Regents Professor of Cellular Biology Rick Tarleton, CTEGD consolidates UGA’s extensive, campus-wide tropical disease knowledge and drug discovery expertise into an interdisciplinary research unit that focuses on finding…
Tags: Human Nature, Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies, marine science
Tue, 03/06/2018 - 10:52am
A new breeding technique using a plant's own DNA could produce crops that are more resistant to drought and disease: A team of University of Georgia researchers has developed a new way to breed plants with better traits. By introducing a human protein into the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana, researchers found that they could selectively activate silenced genes already present within the plant. Using this method to increase diversity…
Tags: marine science, Thinc. at UGA, Udall Scholar, Black History Month, #ThankATrucker, Skidaway Inst of Oceanography - Department of Marine Sciences, movement, Fair, churches, Dawson Hall
Wed, 02/21/2018 - 12:09pm
An international team of researchers has launched the Clinical Epidemiology Database, an open-access online resource enabling investigators to maximize the utility and reach of their data and to make optimal use of information released by others: Population-based epidemiological studies provide new opportunities for innovation and collaboration among researchers addressing pressing global-health concerns. As with the vast quantities of…
Tags: wellness, government, Human Nature, marine science
Wed, 09/02/2015 - 11:16am
On the heels of news from over the summer on the UGA informatics initiative, proposals and new positions have been approved at the university level that moves UGA a few more steps in that direction: [UGA] is building upon its established strengths in the interdisciplinary field of informatics by creating the Georgia Informatics Institute for Research and Education. Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost Pamela Whitten has charged…
Tags: conjecture, marine science, Human Nature, Demosthenian Hall, Germanic and Slavic Studies
Tue, 07/21/2015 - 12:04pm
You can read about the Information Age on almost any page, on practically any day. More data has been created in the last fifteen years than in all previous human history. What does this mean for science? For research? For scholarship? Quite a byte(!), it turns out. Managing, storing and making this data accessible is a Herculean task that is growing by the day. It is arguably one of the greatest next-challenges of civilization, not to mention…
Tags: conjecture, marine science, Human Nature, Department of Marine Sciences
Fri, 12/19/2014 - 10:59am
At the turn of the millennium, the cost to sequence a single human genome exceeded $50 million and the process took several years. Today, researchers can sequence a genome in a single afternoon for just few thousand dollars. Technological advances have ushered in the era of “Big Data,” where biologists collect immense datasets, seeking patterns that may explain important diseases or identify drug and vaccine targets. But what to do with it?…
Tags: media, marine science, D.W. Brooks Mall
Fri, 09/26/2014 - 10:20am
Great opportunity to feature not just one of our star faculty members, but also an emerging challenge for all researchers everywhere in this era of big data: Jessica Kissinger is a molecular geneticist whose research on the evolution of disease and the genomes of eukaryotic pathogenic organisms—Cryptosporidium, Sarcocystis, Toxoplasma andPlasmodium (malaria) among them—has led her to perhaps the emerging issue among research scientists: managing…
Tags: Human Nature, Earth, Climate Change, marine science, Clarke Central
Thu, 05/29/2014 - 11:03am
There are a number of species that have a low to negligible probability of developing cancer. These include squirrels, turtles, the mole rat and certain whales. The reasons why are linked to these species' ability to adapt their oxygen demand when faced with a low oxygen supply. That connection itself goes back to a discover by the great physiologist and Nobel laureate Otto Warburg, who hypothesized in 1924 that, whatever the secondary causes of…
Tags: Human Nature, 4, Go Dawgs, Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies, georgia bulldogs, marine science
Fri, 05/04/2012 - 9:36am
A research team led by Ying Xu, Regents-Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar and professor of bioinformatics and computational biology in the Franklin College, has published some compeeling new findings on the growth of cancer cells: Low oxygen levels in cells may be a primary cause of uncontrollable tumor growth in some cancers, according to a new University of Georgia study. The authors' findings run counter to widely accepted beliefs…
Tags: 4, Human Nature, marine science, Conner Hall