Fri, 07/28/2017 - 1:39pm
A provocative new study from psychology researchers published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences indicates that practicing with others shapes not only what monkeys learn, but also how they learn: Culture extends biology in that the setting of development shapes the traditions that individuals learn, and over time, traditions evolve as occasional variations are learned by others. In humans, interactions with others…
Tags: Carl Vinson Institute of Government International Center, Biomedical and Health Sciences Institute, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, diseases, Franklin College
Fri, 11/20/2015 - 10:26am
Psychology researchers have linked sensory function to congnitive function in an interesting new study: researchers from UGA's Neuropsychology and Memory Assessment Laboratory and Vision Sciences Laboratory collaborated to use a method based on measuring processing speed through sight. Catherine Mewborn, a doctoral candidate in UGA's Franklin College of Arts and Sciences department of psychology, led the study. "We knew that sensory function is…
Tags: Carl Vinson Institute of Government International Center, Franklin College, Human Nature
Mon, 04/23/2012 - 9:12am
Can we understand art better without reducing the magic it can work on us? That is not the theme of this article by E. O. Wilson, though it would seem to be one implication of the schema he describes:  RICH AND SEEMINGLY BOUNDLESS as the creative arts seem to be, each is filtered through the narrow biological channels of human cognition. Our sensory world, what we can learn unaided about reality external to our bodies, is pitifully small. Our…
Tags: Institute of Native American Studies, Earth, Institute for African American Studies, Franklin College, Conner Hall