Fri, 08/14/2015 - 10:25am
Looking at younger star systems in the early stages of development is the best way for astronomers to learn how our solar system evolved. In the new issue of Science, a team of astronomers that includes Inseok Song from the department of physics and astronomy has discovered a Jupiter-like planet within a young star system that could serve as a guide for understanding how planets formed around our sun: The new planet, called 51 Eridani b, is the…
Tags: 9/11, Panel Discussion, The Graduate School
Mon, 02/16/2015 - 10:35am
Happy Presidents Day. Scientific American has a great post about a little-known work by Edgar Allen Poe that presented a kind of preview of modern physics and cosmology: According to Robinson, Eureka has always been “an object of ridicule,” too odd even for devotees of Poe, the emperor of odd. But Robinson contends that Eureka is actually “full of intuitive insight”–and anticipates ideas remarkably similar to those of modern physics and…
Tags: exit show, The Graduate School, printmaking, jewelry and metals, tournament, policy, Laboratory of Archeology
Mon, 07/09/2012 - 11:29am
Scientists at the University of Georgia, the University of California, San Diego, UCLA, California State Polytechnic University and the Australia National University have collaborated on a study, published in the journal Nature, suggesting new information on how planets are formed. The study: began with a curious and unexpected finding: Within three years, the cloud of dust circling a young star in the Scorpius-Centaurus stellar nursery simply…
Tags: Creative Writing Program, The Graduate School, Human Nature