Tue, 09/22/2015 - 2:43pm
Michael Axtell, Penn State department of biology, presents this lecture. His research interests are listed as follows: We are biologists who use diverse plant species to study a class of genes that produce small RNAs. Small RNAs went largely undetected until around the turn of the century. We now know that they are critical components of gene expression in nearly all eukaryotic organisms. These small RNAs are functionally united in that they all…
Tue, 09/22/2015 - 2:40pm
Jill Anderson, UGA department of genetics, presents this lecture. Her research interests include: Our lab also investigates seed dispersal by frugivorous fish in tropical South America. Seed dispersal is a critical stage in the life history of plants. It determines the initial pattern of juvenile distribution, and influences community dynamics, species diversity and gene flow among populations. One major group of vertebrates has been largely…
Tue, 09/22/2015 - 2:33pm
Chung-Jui Tsai, UGA department of genetics, presents this lecture. Her website states: I am a plant biologist with a special passion for large organisms - trees! Trees are 'large' not merely by their physical or genome size, but primarily by their longevity. Longevity depends on a perennial growth habit, which can mean added functionalities for genes, proteins and metabolites compared to herbaceous annuals. The quest for 'what makes a tree a…
Tue, 09/22/2015 - 2:29pm
Dave Des Marais, Harvard, presents this lecture. From his website: I study the diversity of life at many different scales. Like most of us, I am amazed by the visual diversity of plant life. But I am also fascinated by the diversity of genes, proteins, and other molecules which give rise to the beautiful plants that surround us. My research addresses how molecular processes shape organismal diversity, and how these processes evolve within and…
Tue, 09/22/2015 - 2:25pm
Edward McAssey presents a seminar. Hosted by: John M. Burke. His research focus is plant evolutionary genetics and genomics. More specifically, studying the genetic basis of evolutionary divergence within the sunflower family (i.e., the Compositae or the Asteraceae). He also maintains an interest in the ecological and evolutionary impact of transgene escape from genetically modified crops into their wild relatives.
Tue, 09/22/2015 - 11:49am
Brian Kvitko, from the department of plant pathology at University of Georgia, will present the following: Plants encode large sets of cell surface pattern recognition receptors that are able to detect “non-self” microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) such as bacterial flagellin. In Arabidopsis thaliana the bacterial flagellin epitope flg22 is a potent elicitor of the Pattern-Triggered-Immunity (PTI) response which converts the leaf…
Tue, 09/22/2015 - 11:43am
Rita Tamayo, from the department of microbiology and immunology at UNC School of Medicine, will present a lecture on the following: Clostridium difficile causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea in humans, with approximately 250,000 cases and 14,000 deaths per year in the U.S. alone. A Gram-positive obligate anaerobe, the formation of metabolically dormant, oxygen‐resistant endospores allows transmission between hosts. Once in the anaerobic large…
Tue, 09/22/2015 - 11:38am
Daniel Wall, from the department of molecular biology at the University of Wyoming, will present this lecture: Cooperative behavior among individuals often involves resource sharing which in turn provides fitness advantages to the community. Myxobacteria are a microbial example where individuals share their resources to build cooperative multicellular communities, as exemplified by fruiting body development. In the case of Myxococcus xanthus,…
Wed, 09/16/2015 - 4:25pm
"Isa Genzken: Geometries of Lived Perspective," Lisa Lee, an assistant professor of art history at Emory University. Lee will discusses German artist Genzken, whose large wooden sculptures challenge the understanding of line and surface. Between 1976 and 1985, the Genzken produced a series of floor-skimming wood sculptures that rigorously elaborate the stereometric forms of the ellipsoid and the hyperboloid. Yet rather than illustrate…
Mon, 09/14/2015 - 4:57pm
Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University, will present "Genealogy, Genetics and Race" as the 2015 Peabody-Smithgall Lecture. Gates, a celebrated scholar and Peabody winner, has created 13 documentary films and authored 16 books and scores of articles.  Presented by the Peabody Awards and sponsored by the Morton Theatre…